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Can You Grow Your Brain?

7 Simple Steps for Expanding Your Brain Capacity

Whether you’re interested in growing your brain or reversing some of the damage done, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., says it’s scientifically possible.

Medical Director of NeuroGrow Brain Fitness Center and affiliate staff member of Johns Hopkins Medicine, neurologist and neuroscientist Fotuhi is widely regarded as an authority in the field of memory, aging, Alzheimer’s disease, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and brain vitality.

“Your brain is an organ,” explains Fotuhi. “In the same way you can facilitate your organs shriveling away or growing more robust, there are things you can do to make your brain bigger and stronger. And this is not hypothetical — you can defy ageing by implementing simple lifestyle changes.”

Fotuhi cites the seven steps he uses in his Brain Fitness Program which have been medically proven to optimize memory and overall cognitive performance during a session at the 2018 YPO EDGE.

  • Get fit — people who walk at least one mile a day reduce the risk of getting Alzheimer’s by 48 percent simply by increasing the amount of oxygen to their brain.
  • Eat a Mediterranean diet — rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, olive oil and fish and low in red meat, processed foods, poultry and dairy, eating a Mediterranean diet will make your mind sharper in six months and less susceptible to Alzheimer’s.
  • Have a purpose in life; follow your passion — studies show that people who have a sense of purpose in life can harbor significant amounts of Alzheimer’s pathology in their brain without showing the symptoms.
  • Take omega-3 supplements — omega-3fatty acids are highly concentrated in the brain and are important for healthy cognitive and behavioral functions.
  • Learn new things — the process of learning and acquiring new information and experiences can stimulate new brain cell growth.
  • Sleep well — poor sleep is a risk factor for cognitive
  • Meditate — a general consensus concerning cognitive decline has led many scientists to search for new preventive strategies, with growing evidence that meditation can serve as a potential tool.

> View Fotuhi’s YPO EDGE talk for an in-depth look at the steps you can take to grow your brain

 

Deborah Stoll’s work as a journalist has been featured in The Economist’s online magazine, More Intelligent Life, in LA Weekly and its food blog, Squid Ink, as well as on the music site Buzzbands LA. Her short stories have appeared in the Los Angeles quarterly Slake and the literary website Fresh Yarn. As a musician, Stoll’s songs have been featured on American Idol, Glee and CSI: Miami, and her collective work as a content creator and animator has more than 1 million views on YouTube.